Category Archives: JPHMP Direct Voices

The Power of Introducing Racism as a Public Health Crisis Policies

by Jeanette Kowalik, PhD, MPH, MCHES This is the first installment of the APHA HA Section–Public Health Management to Practice series. We will begin to discuss the significance of introducing racism as a public health crisis. Due to the nature of this topic, it will be delivered in three parts to capture the background of this work, application, and implications

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What Does a Manuscript Rejection Really Mean? (Probably Not What You Think)

by Justin B. Moore, PhD, MS, FACSM As I’ve mentioned previously, science is a failure business. Whether it’s a manuscript, a job search, or a grant application, the odds are that you’ll experience one or more rejections on the way to success. But what does rejection mean in this context? Does it mean you’re a bad writer, a bad candidate,

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How Performance Improvement Can Support COVID Response 

by David Stone, MS, CPLP Think you’ve heard enough about COVID? I know you’re probably exhausted from it, but public health is still both battling it and learning from it. We’ll continue to learn well beyond when the pandemic has ended. And a key method for that learning is through the sharing of peer experiences.   On February 10, PHAB hosted a webinar titled “Advancing Public Health Performance in Times of COVID-19: Insights

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APHA Health Administration Section Launches a New Series on JPHMP Direct

by Brenda Stevenson Marshall, PhD, MPH, MAE In 2015, the APHA Health Administration Section partnered with the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice to develop the annual Research to Practice Award to encourage the translation of research findings to inform decision making and action by public health practice and policy stakeholders, development of new and/or effective dissemination strategies for

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COVID-19 Contact Tracing and Health Inequity

by Gulzar H. Shah, PhD, MStat, MS, and Jessica Kronstadt, MPP COVID-19 does not discriminate; or does it? Many say, “COVID-19 is an equal opportunity offender,” implying that the virus treats rich and poor, urban and rural, and homeowners, renters, and unhoused individuals equally. Thinking superficially, the argument may seem convincing. However, true inequities and disparities arise from social structures

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Students Who Rocked Public Health 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic created a “new normal” in 2020 that included controversial mitigation strategies such as masking up and staying home and became the country’s primary focus, punctuated by a summer of civil unrest, peaceful (and sometimes not so peaceful) protests, and a contentious presidential election. The student projects we’ve selected this year reflect the best of 2020 as students

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Why Performance Improvement Still Matters in Your Health Department

by David Stone, MS, CPTD The past year was one like most of us in public health have never experienced before. Certainly, much was learned about our public health practices. Some were upheld, others were revised, and still others were moments of growth. While there were plenty of issues to dissect from 2020, I’m going to start the year by

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NACCHO Book Review: Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present

by Emily Yox, MPH Each month, NACCHO brings you a new public health book, read and reviewed by NACCHO staff. Book reviews in this series originally appeared on NACCHO Voice: The Word on Local health Departments and are republished here with permission. This book is one of the best historical compilations of the abuses of Black Americans done in the name of science and

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